Herb of the Day: Pau D’Arco

HOTD Pau D'Arco FB

In the rain forests of South America grows a beautiful towering tree up to 125 feet high.  This is the tabebuia avellanedae or Pau D’Arco tree.  The inner bark of this tree has been a staple in Amazonian medicine chests for centuries and is rapidly gaining popularity in Western Medicine.  The wood … Continue reading

Herb of the Day: Yarrow

HOTD Yarrow

This pretty plant is a favorite among both herbalists and birds!  Many birds use yarrow as a lining in their nest.  Use of this plant in nests helps to repel parasites and mosquitoes from the nest.  Humans have used yarrow for quite some time to stop bleeding and heal wounds. … Continue reading

Herb of the Day: Pipsissewa

HOTD Pippissewa

Pipsissewa was a favorite herb among Native Americans and early European settlers.  This small evergreen derives its name from a Canadian dialect (called Cree) and is translated into English as “it breaks into small pieces.”  The name is derived from the traditional herbal use for Pipsissewa for breaking apart kidney … Continue reading

Herb of the Day: Slippery Elm

Slippery Elm

Slippery Elm has a fascinating history.  When settlers first arrived in America they discovered Slippery Elm as one of the earliest sources of food.  The inner bark is extremely nourishing and stays with you for quite a while.  In fact, George Washington and his troops survived off Slippery Elm during … Continue reading

Herb of the Day: Borage

A favorite food for bees, a delicious addition to a salad and an herb beloved by herbalist, borage is a great plant to know about!

This beautiful star-shaped flower is gaining popularity as bees have an affinity for it.  Documented use has been found all the way back to Ancient Greece and was once used extensively throughout Europe.  Borage is often used in small batch liquors and cordials largely due to its fresh flavor and … Continue reading

Herb of the Day- Irish Moss

This plant is high in many trace vitamins and minerals including Vitamins A, B, C, and D. It is also high in calcium, iron and iodine.

This beautiful, highly mucilaginous plant is actually not a moss at all, but rather a type of algae.  Found along the coasts of the Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea you’ll find Irish Moss growing on rocks.  As the name implies, Irish Moss is abundant near Ireland. This plant is processed … Continue reading

Herb of the Day: Goldenseal

This plant is worth its weight in gold. Goldenseal is often hailed as one of the most valuable and useful herbs available. One of the primary features of goldenseal is its ability to help the mucous membranes, greatly benefiting the sinuses.

This plant is worth its weight in gold.  Goldenseal is often hailed as one of the most valuable and useful herbs available.  One of the primary features of goldenseal is its ability to help the mucous membranes, greatly benefiting the sinuses.  Many also know of goldenseal’s ability to help heal … Continue reading

Herb of the Day: Valerian

Hippocrates, known as the Father of Medicine, was one of the first to document using this herb. This plant has been widely used as a sedative but research seems to not be able to nail down quite why this herb is so extremely effective in helping with sleep.

A couple weeks ago we introduced you to Hops.  Today we’d like to introduce you to an herb frequently used alongside hops- Valerian. Hippocrates, known as the Father of Medicine, was one of the first to document using this herb.  This plant has been widely used as a sedative but … Continue reading

Herb of the Day: Licorice Root

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When most people hear licorice root they think about the black or red candy with a flavor they either love or hate.  Licorice goes well beyond candy and has been used for thousands of years around the world as a medicinal herb.  This root has an incredible array of uses … Continue reading

Herb of the Day: Comfrey

comfrey

Comfrey can be found as far back as the middle ages where it was commonly used and added to baths. As far back as 2000 years ago, the Chinese were using it as part of traditional healing. In the past, it has been referred to as “knitbone” for healing abilities. … Continue reading