Herb of the Day: St John’s Wort

HOTD St Johns Wort

Named after John the Baptist there are a number of theories as to why this plant has its name.  Some say it was his favorite plant, others say it is due to the fact that the flowers bloom around St. John’s Day and others state it’s because of the coloring of … Continue reading

Herb of the Day: Pau D’Arco

HOTD Pau D'Arco FB

In the rain forests of South America grows a beautiful towering tree up to 125 feet high.  This is the tabebuia avellanedae or Pau D’Arco tree.  The inner bark of this tree has been a staple in Amazonian medicine chests for centuries and is rapidly gaining popularity in Western Medicine.  The wood … Continue reading

Herb of the Day: Elderberry

Elderberry

One of the most popular herbs this time of year is Elderberry.  Documented use of this herb dates back to the 4th century with Hippocrates, and it has remained a popular go-to for herbalists ever since then.  Due to their high Vitamin C and antioxidant levels, elderberry is widely used … Continue reading

Herb of the Day: Cinnamon

HOTD Cinnamon (1)

Cinnamomum verum or Ceylon cinnamon is most likely not what you’ll find in your home spice cabinet.  Cassia cinnamon, is what is typically used as cinnamon although the Ceylon cinnamon is actually “real” cinnamon.  Ceylon is quite a bit more expensive and difficult to harvest so it has been replaced … Continue reading

Herb of the Day: Oregon Grape Root

Oregon Grape Root is often used in place of the endangered goldenseal.  It has many of the beneficial anti-microbial benefits of goldenseal.

Last week we looked at Goldenseal, today we’ll look at Oregon Grape Root which is often used in place of the endangered goldenseal.  It has many of the beneficial anti-microbial benefits of goldenseal, but does not affect the blood sugar like goldenseal.  This is a beautiful plant of which many … Continue reading

Herb of the Day: Scullcap (Skullcap)

Also known as “mad dog weed” scullcap (also spelled skullcap) has been used to treat rabies in dogs as well as a number of ailments for humans.

This beautiful plant is named for the flowers it grows which resemble helmets worn by ancient European soldiers.  Widely used among Native Americans, in Chinese Medicine, and among ancient European healers, Scullcap can be consumed in teas, tinctures, or extracts.  The herb does have a bitter flavor so many prefer … Continue reading