Iron supplements during Pregnancy and Iron deficiency / anemia

Being pregnant and/or finding out you might be anemic brings up a lot of questions. There are a LOT of forms of iron supplements out there and especially if you’re pregnant, this is a time to look for safest from of iron supplementation.

If you search the internet for “What is Iron?” they usually list what foods contain iron (beware of “fortified with iron” foods with synthetic and inorganic iron). Ever wonder why food is the first way listed to get iron?

Foods contain organic forms of iron as opposed to inorganic forms of iron. Our body was designed to absorb and use organic minerals. Plants take iron from the dirt and put into an organic form. If we take salt or an iron shaving and grind it up nano size we have a form of iron. Search for the topic “Iron” in Wikipedia: “Many cereals have some added iron (the element metal iron).[1][2] It is added to cereal in the form of tiny metal filings. It is even possible to see the slivers sometimes by taking an extremely strong magnet and putting it into the box. The magnet will attract these pieces of iron. Eating these small metal shavings are not harmful to our body.”

That is the way the majority of the world sees iron supplements. At a 2% absorption rate (which is about what you get with most supplementation) think about how much of that kind of iron you would have to actually eat to get your body’s real needs met of the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) of about fifteen milligrams!!  So it’s not quantity but rather quality that is the most important when it comes to iron supplementation.

What are the signs or symptoms of lacking iron? These are not in any particular order and it is not an all inclusive list, but here are a few things to look for.

iron supplements during pregnancy

Some of these could be normal pregnancy symptoms and not necessarily a sign of iron deficiency, however, most pregnant women NEED MORE iron. Plus most pregnant women get tired, have fatigue, whether anemic or not. The American Academy of Family Physicians suggests that pregnant women take iron to help guard against anemia.

Eating an iron-rich diet and taking a multivitamin with iron may be a useful way to prevent iron deficiency anemia, but it is usually not enough to treat anemia once it has developed. Women seem to need more iron than men due to menstruation, pregnancy, and breastfeeding. Often vegetarians who have enough iron in the diet still need supplementation because their diets may contain higher levels of inhibitors of iron absorption, such as phytate, tannins and calcium (see the notes section for more on this).

Many health issues and products can be confusing. Here is an example of why a simple question can be confusing:

Question: Should I take my iron supplement with food or on an empty stomach?

Answer: Absorption of iron is reduced when the supplement is taken with food and if taken without food, it is more likely to cause nausea but this reduces the potential for constipation because more is absorbed. Plus taking vitamin C with iron helps increase absorption, while dairy foods, bran, tea and unprocessed whole grains will reduce absorption.

After reading the answer, then YOU have to decide on how to take iron. So again, what is the answer?!! The answer is I take just a few drops of Tri-Iron on an empty stomach and with minerals taking a small amount more often works better than a lot at one time. I give my body a few hours to absorb the iron, then i take a few more drops. If you are focusing on minerals and health, this is the BEST way to take them. I often put a few drops in my water too. This adds flavor to the water and the improves the delivery of the minerals to the body as well. If my stomach is acting up and being sensitive then I eat about an hour after I drink my homemade mineral water so I don’t get that nausea feeling. It’s rare but it can happen, so after 20 years of using the product, we do try to have answers for you!

So are you feeling Tired? After consulting your doctor to find out if you are anemic and you are looking for a non-constipating, safe iron supplement then Tri-Iron is your answer.  After consulting your doctor to find out if you are anemic and you are looking for a non-constipating, safe iron supplement then Tri-Iron is your answer. iron supplements during pregnancyTri-Iron offers the highest absorption rate as it is a combination of all-natural and organic herbs. This is in contrast to other constipating tablets that offer a 2-10% essential iron absorption rate. Just a few drops of Tri-Iron a day satisfies the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) of fifteen milligrams of iron for women of child-bearing age.Tri-Iron offers the highest absorption rate as it is a combination of all-natural and organic herbs. This is in contrast to other constipating tablets that offer a 2-10% essential iron absorption rate. Just a few drops of Tri-Iron a day satisfies the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) of fifteen milligrams of iron for women of child-bearing age.

This is the safest available all organic natural iron formula.

“I love Tri iron! I have 3 girls who are menstrual and they all take it one week before and during their cycle. This helps with dizziness, weakness and all over tiredness that comes with anemia. I have personally used it for years.”        -Maria V.

A milligram is a unit of weight, while a teaspoon is a unit of volume. The RDA of 15mg per day is based on a dry measure vs our liquid so there is no direct equivalent but if one wanted to get the RDA of 15mg/day one would take 1/4 tsp of the Tri-Iron formula. If one were using 0.27mg for an infant that would be about 1-2 drops every 8 hrs and for a woman 150 lbs taking the 15mg/day it would be 1/4 tsp/day.

It’s best if taken as 10 drops every 8 hours for best absorption. Take just a few drops of Tri-Iron on an empty stomach and with minerals taking a small amount more often works better than a lot at one time. I give my body a few hours to absorb the iron, then i take a few more drops. If you are focusing on minerals and health this is the BEST way to take them. I often put a few drops in my water and take them that way too. Improves the water and the delivery of the minerals to the body as well. If my stomach is acting up and being sensitive then I eat then about an hour later I drink my homemade mineral water so I don’t get that nausea feeling. It’s rare but it can happen.

Other notes: Knowing what NOT to eat is also important when it comes to iron. Coffee and tea with Caffeine contains polyphenols and tannins inhibit iron absorption and uptake by about 50%. Phytates in several legumes and grains, phosphates in cola drinks, proteins in soybeans, and even high fiber foods, whole grains and bran may interfere with iron absorption.

Some studies suggest that Oxalic acid found in spinach, Swiss chard, beetroot leaves. tea, chocolate and other cocoa products. It can bind with calcium and magnesium to form insoluble salts which reduce the absorption of iron.

Calcium supplements, drinking milk or taking antacids should NOT be taken at the same time as iron supplements. If you eat or drink the above it is best to wait about 2 hours before taking your iron supplement.

Other odd notes: Blackened stools are normal. Not likely to happen but put drops in back of throat if you are worried about staining your teeth if you use whitening agents which soften the enamel of the tooth, yet the same whitening agents will clean off the tint quickly.

More medical / technical info (yet keeping it simple):  Iron is a component of hemoglobin, the substance in red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout your body. Hemoglobin represents about two-thirds of the body’s iron. No iron = not enough red blood cells = anemia = not enough oxygen =  tired and fatigued, brain confusion, lower immune and if pregnant = higher risk of premature birth.

Iron is found in every cell in the body, including brain cells. It is needed for energy and proper enzyme functions and metabolism that support a health immune system that fight bacteria.

Warning: Too much iron can be toxic. People with kidney or liver damage, alcoholism, or ulcers. Iron overload may cause uncomfortable symptoms such as nausea, abdominal pain, constipation and joint pain. Very high doses can be fatal, particularly in children.

Keep iron supplements out of the reach of children.

Note: TriLight Health employees are not licensed practitioners and cannot prescribe which products you should use. Our comments are educational. If you are pregnant or breast-feeding, please see our pregnancy safe section. As with all our formulas, especially if you are pregnant or breast-feeding, please consult your healthcare practitioner before using products with any other medications. Our statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. Our products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.
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10 Responses to Iron supplements during Pregnancy and Iron deficiency / anemia

  1. sarah w says:

    You reccommend waiting 2 hours after eating foods that inhibit iron absorbtion. what about after taking the iron supplement? How long should you avoid iron absorbtion inhibiting foods? Thanks.

    • It’s a great question Sarah. Wait about 30 minutes and avoid caffeine, milk, antacids, and calcium supplements as they decrease the amount of iron that is absorbed. FYI: vitamin C in a small glass of orange juice can increase absorption, but not it’s not necessary as this formula already has herbs in it to aid in absorption.

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  4. Thanks for posting this article. After my bariatric surgery i was diagnosed with a severe case of anemia due to iron deficiency. Thus doctor told me to have best iron supplement daily. I can feel the difference after having it.

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  6. Anu says:

    I am in my second trimester and have fairly low iron levels. My doctor recommended slow fe tablets that have 65 mg of elemental iron. If i get this product how much of it should I take? Thanks

    • Here’s the general dosage equivalent:

      A milligram is a unit of weight, while a teaspoon is a unit of volume. The RDA of 15mg per day is based on a dry measure vs our liquid so there is no direct equivalent but if one wanted to get the RDA of 15mg/day one would take 1/4 tsp of the Tri-Iron formula. If one were using 0.27mg for an infant that would be about 1-2 drops every 8 hrs and for a woman 150 lbs taking the 15mg/day it would be 1/4 tsp/day.

      So a 1/4 tsp is the equivalent of 15 mg, so time it by about 4 to get the equivalent of the 65 mg that you’re looking for. So about 1 and 1/4 tsp would be what you’re looking for. Does that make sense? Let me know if you have any other questions.

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